Study Finds 4 Modifiable Risk Factors Explain Most Dementia Cases

A recent study of Japanese-American men, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society last month, has found that just four modifiable risk factors could explain the majority of dementia cases.

The study involved 3,468 middle aged men from the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study who were followed up over 25 years. The researchers theorized that a healthy lifestyle in mid-life could reduce an individuals probability of developing dementia in their later years.

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Aluminium In Drinking Water May Raise Alzheimer’s Risk

Much like lead, aluminium is a powerful neurotoxicant that can kill brain cells even at small concentrations, however studies into the role of aluminium in the development of Alzheimer’s disease have been relatively scarce. One area that has been examined is the relationship between aluminium concentrations in drinking water and the subsequent risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Study Finds Healthy Diet Cuts Alzheimer’s Risk By Up To 92%

A study, published in the journal Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders this year, has found that adhering to a healthy diet can slash an individuals risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia by 92% and 88% respectively compared to individuals with an unhealthy diet.

The Finnish researchers looked at data from 525 individuals who completed an extensive questionnaire on their dietary habits. The participants were assigned a healthy-diet score based out of 17 based on their consumption of certain foods.

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High Saturated & Trans Fat Intake Boosts Alzheimer’s Risk In Later Life

Handful of friesDietary fat intake, particularly in the form of saturated and trans fat leads to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia according to recent evidence.

In February 2003, a study was published in the journal Archives of Neurology that linked the consumption of both saturated and trans fats with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

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High Calorie Diets Increase The Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease

In August 2002, a study published in the journal Archives of Neurology suggested that those who consume high calorie diets might be up to 50% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those who consume low calorie diets.

The study involved 980 individuals aged 65 or older from the northern Manhattan area in New York. The participants were followed for an average of four years and during that period, 242 of the individuals developed Alzheimer’s disease.

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