Study Finds 4 Modifiable Risk Factors Explain Most Dementia Cases

A recent study of Japanese-American men, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society last month, has found that just four modifiable risk factors could explain the majority of dementia cases.

The study involved 3,468 middle aged men from the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study who were followed up over 25 years. The researchers theorized that a healthy lifestyle in mid-life could reduce an individuals probability of developing dementia in their later years.

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Aluminium In Drinking Water May Raise Alzheimer’s Risk

Much like lead, aluminium is a powerful neurotoxicant that can kill brain cells even at small concentrations, however studies into the role of aluminium in the development of Alzheimer’s disease have been relatively scarce. One area that has been examined is the relationship between aluminium concentrations in drinking water and the subsequent risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Coffee Consumption In Mid-life Cuts Future Risk Of Brain Lesions

Previously we reported that coffee and other caffeinated drinks may protect against Alzheimer’s disease by strengthening the blood brain barrier. A study, published earlier this year has found further evidence of the protective effect of caffeine on the brain by reporting a decreased risk of brain lesions associated with dementia amongst heavy drinkers of caffeinated beverages.

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Study Finds Healthy Diet Cuts Alzheimer’s Risk By Up To 92%

A study, published in the journal Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders this year, has found that adhering to a healthy diet can slash an individuals risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia by 92% and 88% respectively compared to individuals with an unhealthy diet.

The Finnish researchers looked at data from 525 individuals who completed an extensive questionnaire on their dietary habits. The participants were assigned a healthy-diet score based out of 17 based on their consumption of certain foods.

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Heavy Smokers, Drinkers, Develop Alzheimer’s Disease Earlier

A number of cigarettesBoth heavy smoking and heavy drinking lead to the development of Alzheimer’s disease at an earlier age according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Academy of Neurology held in Chicago between the 12th and 19th of April.

The study involved 938 people aged 60 or older who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers looked at three potential risk factors

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Regular Wine Consumption Lowers Dementia Risk In Women

Red wine in a glassA recent study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in January of this year, has found that regular wine consumption may reduce the risk of women developing dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease.

The Swedish study involved 1,458 women initially aged between 38 and 60. The participants were subjected to a physical examination and completed questionnaires on social and lifestyle factors including alcohol use, cigarette use, and education levels.

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Caffeine Protects Blood-Brain Barrier, May Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

A cup of coffeeScientists at the University of North Dakota have found that as little as one cup of coffee a day might be enough to protect the brain from Alzheimer’s disease by strengthening the blood-brain barrier (BBB).

In the study, published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation, researchers used New Zealand white rabbits to examine the effects of a high cholesterol diet and/or high levels of caffeine consumption on the blood-brain barrier.

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Apples, Oranges, And Bananas Slow Down Alzheimer’s

A half peeled bananaA new study has found that some of the most popular fruits, including bananas, apples, and oranges all contain antioxidants that reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York tested phenolic phytochemicals derived from bananas, oranges, and apples on neuron cells. The researchers found that all three of the fruits protected the neuron cells from oxidative stress and prevented neurotoxicity. Apples were found to have the highest levels of beneficial antioxidants.

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Seven Ways To Slow Or Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

While there are some Alzheimer’s risk factors, such as age and a family history of Alzheimer’s disease that cannot be changed, there are many things you can do to reduce your chances of getting the disease. Here are seven easy ways to slow down or prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

#1 Eat fish at least twice a week or take a fish or flax oil supplement

Omega-3, found in oily fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel as well as flax oil and spinach, has been found to prevent and slow the build up of plaques in the brain.

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Omega 3 In Fish Oil May Prevent Or Slow Alzheimer’s Disease

Tinned fishOmega 3 Fatty Acids found in fish oil may slow or prevent Alzheimer’s disease according to a recent study at the University of California (UCLA) at Los Angeles.

The study, which was published in the December 26 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience found that one of the omega-3 fatty acids known as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) stimulates the production of a protein called LR11. This protein prevents the build up of the protein beta amyloid, which is toxic to brain cells and is found in the brains of Alzheimer’s sufferers.

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