Abdominal Fat May Be Linked To Pancreatic Cancer

A tape measureWomen with large waist sizes may be up to 70% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than their slimmer counterparts according to a new study published online this month in the British Journal of Cancer.

The study, which was headed by Dr Juhua Luo of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, involved the study of almost 140,000 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 from the Women’s Health Initiative. The women were initially free of pancreatic cancer and were followed for an average period of 7.7 years.

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Eight Drinks A Day Almost Doubles Overall Cancer Risk

A cup of beerA report, published by the Cancer Institute NSW in Australia has found that alcohol might be more strongly linked to cancer than previous thought.

The authors of the report reviewed the findings of 634 previous studies to determine the link between alcohol consumption and the risk of various cancers. In total, cancer risk was found to be 22% higher in people who consumed four alcoholic drinks a day compared to non-drinkers and 90% higher in those who consumed eight alcoholic drinks a day. On the other hand, consumption of two alcoholic drinks a day appeared to have little or no effect on cancer risk.

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Heavy Drinking Ups Risk Of Cancer In Mouth, Esophagus, Breast & Liver

A recent analysis of 156 research studies has found that moderate alcohol consumption can increase the risk of developing several forms of cancer including cancers of the mouth, larynx, esophagus, breast, colon, and liver.

The study, published in the journal Preventive Medicine in 2004, involved the analysis of data from 156 studies involving a total of 116,702 individuals in order to determine the effects of alcohol consumption on cancer rates.

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Heavy Drinking Raises Liver Cancer Risk

According to recent evidence, not only does heavy drinking increase the risk of developing cirrhosis of the liver, but it also increases the likelihood of an individual developing hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer.

A recent study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2002, compared the alcohol consumption histories of 464 people who had been diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma to the drinking history of 828 control subjects who were free of hepatocellular carcinoma and other liver diseases.

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Two Drinks A Day Increases Breast Cancer Risk By 32%

A beerEven relatively low levels of alcohol consumption may increase a womens risk of developing one form of breast cancer by a significant amount according to a recent American study of almost 200,000 women.

The research, conducted by the National Cancer Institute looked at data from 184,418 women in order to explore the link between breast cancer and alcohol consumption.

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Cancer Death Rates For Smokers Compared To Non-Smokers

CigarettesMany smokers want to know exactly how much higher their risk of dying from various forms of cancer is compared to non-smokers. Unfortunately the answer is a lot higher, more than 10 times higher for cancers such as lung, larynx, and mouth cancers.

Interestingly some forms of cancer that one wouldn’t normally associate with smoking such as pancreatic cancer, cervical cancer, and acute myeloid leukemia are also more likely in smokers.

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Study: Smokers’ Lung Cancer Risk Not Reduced By Vitamin E, C, Or B9

Pills spilling from bottleA scientific study has shown that three popular vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, and folic acid (vitamin B9) do not reduce lung cancer risk. Furthermore, researchers found a small but significant increase in lung cancer risk amongst smokers taking vitamin E supplements.

The research, which is reported in the March 2008 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, followed 77,126 American men and women from the state of Washington aged between 50 and 76.

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High Blood Sugar Raises Pancreatic, Liver, & Colorectal Cancer Risk

While most people know that high blood sugar levels are a precursor for diabetes, several studies have also suggested a link between high blood sugar levels and the risk of developing some forms of cancer.

The largest of these studies was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in January 2005. The researchers used data from the Korean Cancer Prevention Study (KCPS) which involved more than 1.2 million Koreans between the ages of 30 and 95.

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Obesity Linked To Cancer Of Pancreas, Liver, Bladder & Prostate

Most people know that being overweight increases your risk of developing diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. What a lot of people don’t realise however is that being overweight also increases your risk of developing many forms of cancer.

The most comprehensive study on the environmental and lifestyle factors responsible for cancer is known as “The Cancer Prevention Study 2″. The study was conducted from 1982 to 1997 and followed 1.2 million American men and women

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Breast Cancer Strikes Black Women Earlier And Harder

Black women both develop breast cancer at an earlier age and are more likely to die from it according to a new study published in the British Journal of Cancer.

The study, conducted using patient data from Homerton University Hospital in Hackney from 1994 to 2005 found that black women were diagnosed with breast cancer a massive 21 years earlier on average than white women. The study also suggested a poorer survival rate amongst black women diagnosed with breast cancer

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Breast Cancer More Likely In Overweight Women

Women who are overweight have a greater risk of developing breast cancer according to a recent American study published in the British Journal of Cancer.

The study, conducted by several scientists of the Hormel Institute at the University of Minnesota found that people with lower levels of a protein hormone known as adiponectin or Acrp30 were much more likely to develop breast cancer.

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