Smoking Marijuana Doesn’t Appear To Increase Cancer Risk

Marijuana plantsOver the years, many scientific studies have looked at whether marijuana smokers are at an increased risk of developing cancer. Interestingly, despite the fact marijuana smoke shares many of the same carcinogens as cigarette smoke, no study has found a significantly increased risk of cancer as a result of smoking marijuana.

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Eating Fish May Reduce Cancer Risk

Tinned fishRegular consumption of fish may reduce the risk of developing many forms of cancer including cancers of the esophagus, mouth, stomach, colon, and pancreas according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in July 1999.

The study, conducted by Italian researchers, involved the comparison of over 8,000 people who had been diagnosed with various forms of cancer with 7,990 control subjects who were free of cancer.

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Eight Drinks A Day Almost Doubles Overall Cancer Risk

A cup of beerA report, published by the Cancer Institute NSW in Australia has found that alcohol might be more strongly linked to cancer than previous thought.

The authors of the report reviewed the findings of 634 previous studies to determine the link between alcohol consumption and the risk of various cancers. In total, cancer risk was found to be 22% higher in people who consumed four alcoholic drinks a day compared to non-drinkers and 90% higher in those who consumed eight alcoholic drinks a day. On the other hand, consumption of two alcoholic drinks a day appeared to have little or no effect on cancer risk.

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Heavy Drinking Ups Risk Of Cancer In Mouth, Esophagus, Breast & Liver

A recent analysis of 156 research studies has found that moderate alcohol consumption can increase the risk of developing several forms of cancer including cancers of the mouth, larynx, esophagus, breast, colon, and liver.

The study, published in the journal Preventive Medicine in 2004, involved the analysis of data from 156 studies involving a total of 116,702 individuals in order to determine the effects of alcohol consumption on cancer rates.

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Cancer Death Rates For Smokers Compared To Non-Smokers

CigarettesMany smokers want to know exactly how much higher their risk of dying from various forms of cancer is compared to non-smokers. Unfortunately the answer is a lot higher, more than 10 times higher for cancers such as lung, larynx, and mouth cancers.

Interestingly some forms of cancer that one wouldn’t normally associate with smoking such as pancreatic cancer, cervical cancer, and acute myeloid leukemia are also more likely in smokers.

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