Walnuts Slow Growth Of Breast Cancer Cells

A study, published in the peer reviewed medical journal Nutrition and Cancer, has found that walnuts can dramatically cut the growth rate of breast tumors in mice.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at the Marshall University School of Medicine in West Virginia, USA, involved the implantation of human breast cancer cells in a group of 22 mice. The tumors were allowed to grow to between 3mm and 5mm in size at which point the mice were divided into two groups.

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Study Finds Red Wine Reduces Lung Cancer Risk In Smokers

Red wine in glassA study, published this month in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, And Prevention, has suggested that smokers may be able to reduce their risk of developing lung cancer by as much as 60% by consuming at least one glass of red wine each day.

The study was conducted by scientists at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California, and involved the study of 84,170 men aged between 45 and 69.

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Dairy Products Linked To Increased Risk Of Prostate Cancer

CheeseA high intake of dairy products can increase the risk of prostate cancer by as much as 30% according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2001.

The researchers, based at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, used data from the Physicians’ Health Study which involved more than 20,000 men from the United States who were followed from 1984 to 1995.

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Diets High In Fat, Low In Fruit & Vegetables Linked To Bladder Cancer

A bowl of fruitA low intake of fruit and vegetables, and a high fat diet may be risk factors for bladder cancer according to the findings of a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in April 2000.

The study involved the analysis of 38 previous research studies on the impact of diet on bladder cancer. The researchers looked at six dietary variables: high meat intake, high fat intake, low vegetable consumption, low fruit consumption, low intake of retinol (vitamin A), and low intake of beta-carotene.

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Vitamin E Supplementation Decreases Risk Of Prostate Cancer In Smokers

Some red pillsA form of Vitamin E known as alpha-tocopherol may reduce both the risk of developing and dying from prostate cancer in smokers according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The study, which was published back in 1998 by researchers at the Department of Public Health in Helsinki, Finland, looked at the effect of daily supplementation of 20mg of beta-carotene and/or 50mg of alpha-tocopherol on the risk of prostate cancer. Beta-carotene is an antioxidant that is converted by the body into Vitamin A.

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Broccoli Rich Diets Ward Off Prostate Cancer

A broccoli headA new study has found that men who eat at least 400g of broccoli a week (around three servings) may be at a decreased risk of developing prostate cancer due to broccoli’s ability to modify the expression of certain genes involved in the development of prostate cancer.

The study was carried out by researchers from Norwich in the United Kingdom and was published in the July issue of the journal PLoS One. Researchers followed 22 men aged between 57 and 70 who were at high risk of developing prostate cancer.

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Abdominal Fat May Be Linked To Pancreatic Cancer

A tape measureWomen with large waist sizes may be up to 70% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than their slimmer counterparts according to a new study published online this month in the British Journal of Cancer.

The study, which was headed by Dr Juhua Luo of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, involved the study of almost 140,000 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 from the Women’s Health Initiative. The women were initially free of pancreatic cancer and were followed for an average period of 7.7 years.

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Vitamin D Not Effective In Reducing Prostate Cancer Risk

Some vitamin pillsA new study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute earlier this year has found that Vitamin D is not effective in reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer.

Recent studies have found a link between vitamin D levels and a reduction in the risk of many forms of cancer such as melanoma, breast, colon, and lung cancer however studies on the relationship between vitamin D intake and prostate cancer have yielded conflicting results to date.

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Regular Exercise May Cut Cancer Risk In Men

A man bikingA new study, conducted by Swedish researchers at the Karolinska Institute, has suggested that men who engage in moderate physical exercise in a regular basis have a reduced risk of developing and subsequently dying from cancer.

The study was published this month in the British Journal of Cancer and involved the study of 40,708 Swedish men aged between 45 and 79 who were questioned on their exercise habits.

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Eating Fish May Reduce Cancer Risk

Tinned fishRegular consumption of fish may reduce the risk of developing many forms of cancer including cancers of the esophagus, mouth, stomach, colon, and pancreas according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in July 1999.

The study, conducted by Italian researchers, involved the comparison of over 8,000 people who had been diagnosed with various forms of cancer with 7,990 control subjects who were free of cancer.

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Eight Drinks A Day Almost Doubles Overall Cancer Risk

A cup of beerA report, published by the Cancer Institute NSW in Australia has found that alcohol might be more strongly linked to cancer than previous thought.

The authors of the report reviewed the findings of 634 previous studies to determine the link between alcohol consumption and the risk of various cancers. In total, cancer risk was found to be 22% higher in people who consumed four alcoholic drinks a day compared to non-drinkers and 90% higher in those who consumed eight alcoholic drinks a day. On the other hand, consumption of two alcoholic drinks a day appeared to have little or no effect on cancer risk.

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Folate May Reduce Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Diets high in folate, also known as folic acid or vitamin B9, have been implicated with a reduced risk of many cancers including colo-rectal, lung, and esophageal cancer. Recent evidence also suggests a link between folate and a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk of up to 75% in some cases.

The study, conducted by Swedish researchers and published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in March 2006 involved the study of 81,922 men and women from Sweden for an average of 6.8 years.

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Regular Aspirin Use Leads To A Small Reduction In Breast Cancer Risk

Some pills in a bottleA new study, published in the journal Breast Cancer Research in April this year has found that women who take an aspirin a day have a modestly reduced risk of developing breast cancer compared to women who never use aspirin.

The study, conducted by researchers at the US National Cancer Institute in Rockville, USA, focused on 136,408 women aged between 51 and 72 and who were free of cancer at the beginning of the study in 1996-1997.

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Diabetics Are Less Likely To Develop Advanced Prostate Cancer

Those who have diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer, particularly advanced prostate cancer according to a recent study. Diabetics tend to have lower testosterone levels than non-diabetics which is thought to be responsible for the lower incidence of prostate cancer observed in diabetic individuals.

The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2004, involved comparing the diabetes status of 1,110 individuals from the US Physicians Heath Study who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer and comparing them to 1,110 control subjects who were free of prostate cancer.

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Heavy Drinking Ups Risk Of Cancer In Mouth, Esophagus, Breast & Liver

A recent analysis of 156 research studies has found that moderate alcohol consumption can increase the risk of developing several forms of cancer including cancers of the mouth, larynx, esophagus, breast, colon, and liver.

The study, published in the journal Preventive Medicine in 2004, involved the analysis of data from 156 studies involving a total of 116,702 individuals in order to determine the effects of alcohol consumption on cancer rates.

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Heavy Drinking Raises Liver Cancer Risk

According to recent evidence, not only does heavy drinking increase the risk of developing cirrhosis of the liver, but it also increases the likelihood of an individual developing hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer.

A recent study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2002, compared the alcohol consumption histories of 464 people who had been diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma to the drinking history of 828 control subjects who were free of hepatocellular carcinoma and other liver diseases.

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Two Drinks A Day Increases Breast Cancer Risk By 32%

A beerEven relatively low levels of alcohol consumption may increase a womens risk of developing one form of breast cancer by a significant amount according to a recent American study of almost 200,000 women.

The research, conducted by the National Cancer Institute looked at data from 184,418 women in order to explore the link between breast cancer and alcohol consumption.

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Cancer Death Rates For Smokers Compared To Non-Smokers

CigarettesMany smokers want to know exactly how much higher their risk of dying from various forms of cancer is compared to non-smokers. Unfortunately the answer is a lot higher, more than 10 times higher for cancers such as lung, larynx, and mouth cancers.

Interestingly some forms of cancer that one wouldn’t normally associate with smoking such as pancreatic cancer, cervical cancer, and acute myeloid leukemia are also more likely in smokers.

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